Art of Prose: rapport

You ever want to be a good story teller to capture people’s attention? I did ever since grade school. The teachers and students really liked my stories. I remember that I kind of enjoyed writing them, but I enjoyed seeing the reaction to them even better.

I forget if it was fifth or sixth grade when I started testing different writing styles to see what ellicited the most positive reactions. I also found out what kind of content ellicited the most negative reactions – which was also very amusing – because I was a kid.

I discovered that the use of a sensual experience to the readers/audience has the greatest impact. Can you imagine a little ten or eleven year old exploring the facets of mind control marketing? Such was my life. Of course, I had no idea that’s what I was doing. I just thought it was fun.

For the moment, I’d like to focus your attention on essay #12 at http://mindcontrol101.com/essays.html. I’ll go over a few points in this essay every now and then to make you understand why it won first place in this “mind control” essay contest.

Skim over it first. Notice that there are no opinions, postulations, posturing or assumption of authority in this essay; all it’s “reporting” is the experience, a sensual experience of strange events made familiar.

As you see it contains the standard where, when and why the protagonist is there. The difference is in how the story is delivered. First off, everyone has experienced a twisted day in their lives. When someone wants to tell you how their beautiful day became twisted, of course, people can completely relate, so they want to hear more. That first, short paragraph has already established rapport with the reader.

Within this same, short paragraph, the color blue is attached to a moving object, a car. Royal blue is attached to the sixth chakra as an extension of the eyes and other senses. Here we allow the reader to “settle” on the proper color themselves through persistence of thought (which I will discuss in another post).

As a dream symbol, a car moving represents the path we take in life. A blue car moving opens the senses to inner thought, imagination allowing the experience to be complete generated from within as a kind of inner intention of moving.

Do you understand where the power is coming from? In the art of prose, we generate that intention and imagination in the reader through the proper triggers. Corporate blue exists exactly for this purpose: To stimulate the imagination of their market as well as their workers.

This is also the reason advertisers use dream imagery extensively in their commercials: Although the commercial is dismissed as nothing more on the conscious level, the symbols and recurring familiar imagery have deep meaning to their audience that tends to stick in the mind. This is also what essay #12 achieves by simple, yet powerful words on a page.

Enjoy the “report” for now. There are elements in this story that appealed especially to the JK Ellis – elements of which he is probably not aware, but you will be. Stay Tuned. Thanks for your time.

Happy Healing,

Randolph